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Standard Kitchen Island Size

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Standard Kitchen Island Size

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Standard Kitchen Island Size

Islands have become somewhat standard in kitchens today. They are convenient and can aesthetically enhance the space. But islands don’t necessarily work for every single kitchen. Sometimes a space may simply be too small for an island. So what are the right kitchen island dimensions? Island Dimension Information The island can be the heart and central hub of your kitchen, but it needs to be the right size. Think a “Goldilocks and the Three Bears” kind of design. Too small and it won’t function the way it should, too big and it can hinder traffic flow and decrease overall efficiency—it needs to be just right. The dimensions of your island will depend on how it’s being used. How Tall Should a Kitchen Island Be? Is your kitchen island being used for mainly food preparation and cooking? 36 inches is a recommended standard height. Seating at a 36-inch-high island is somewhere between a typical kitchen table seat and typical bar stools. Some professionals recommend 42 inches for an island that will be used mainly for seating/eating. How Wide Should a Kitchen Island Be? Many islands are about 2 or 3 feet but if you need more counter space, seating space, etc., you can go a little larger. Approximately 7 feet is sometimes necessary if you want a cooktop or sink in the island. How Deep Should a Kitchen Island Be? It’s recommended that your island should be at least 2 feet deep. Leave enough room on all sides—3 feet of floor space on the ends of the island is good. Remember—you want to be able to move around easily in the kitchen. Other Kitchen Island Tips Islands can be great places for extra storage! Usually, two 24-inch base cabinets back to back can accommodate most under-island storage purposes. Two-tiered kitchen islands can be great for multiple functions. For instance, you can use the lower level for food prep and the higher level for eating (with tall bar stools or chairs). If you do a lot of cooking, an island with a second sink or stove may be ideal. Custom Kitchen Design in MD, DC & VA When it comes to your kitchen island, the sky is the limit! A custom kitchen design will look exactly how you want it to—including the island. Our professionals can help you come up with the best design, in terms of efficiency and aesthetics, based on your budget and the size and shape of your kitchen. Feel free to browse our online portfolio and get in touch with us today by contacting us online, calling us, or visiting our showroom in Rockville, Maryland!
standard kitchen island size 1

Standard Kitchen Island Size

2 × Size, Placement and Storage Size, Placement and Storage Illustration by Duo Dickinson Shoehorning an island into a kitchen that’s too small is a mistake. Here are the minimum clearances the author uses between islands and cabinets, as well as minimum sizes for islands with different uses. Remember, these are minimums; it’s better to be more generous if your floor plan allows. Size and Placement Kitchen islands suck space. At minimum, an island should be 4 feet long and a little more than 2 feet deep, but it must also have room for people to move and work around it. Unless your kitchen is at least 8 feet deep and more than 12 feet long, don’t even think about an island. (For more on practical dimensions for islands and the minimum space around them, see “Island Minimums,” above.) Storage Needs You can gain valuable real estate on both the “working” side and the “public” side of an island for storage, always a critical need in kitchens. On the public side, take advantage of shallow cabinets (installed back-to-back, with deeper cabinets facing the kitchen) for serving items—napkins, cutlery, platters, etc.—that don’t need to be in the food prep area. On the working side, make sure there’s room to store the things that are needed for the activity the island supports, because an island’s strong suit is also its biggest downfall: It’s isolated. If it’s a cooking island, then pots, pans, and spices should be at hand. The space under cooktops is great for deep drawers for pots and pans. (The temptation is to hang them from an expensive pot rack, which won’t hold deeper pots or lids and gets in the way of your view.) If it’s a prep island, don’t forget storage for knives and small appliances like mixers and food processors (consider pop-ups — platforms that swing out from behind a door in the island base—or appliance garages for these), and convenient access to garbage and compost bins. If the island is going to be dedicated to cleanup, you’ll need a place for dish towels, detergent, and brushes. Undercounter storage space is limited on islands that include a sink and/or major appliances like a dishwasher or oven; you’ll have to plan more carefully for those. The same is true for cooktops with downdraft fans, the machinery for which must be stored in the cabinet below. One way around this is to use the ends of the island. Round ends are perfect for lazy Susans, and almost any island end can accommodate open shelving or even a shallow cabinet.
standard kitchen island size 2

Standard Kitchen Island Size

Size, Placement and Storage Illustration by Duo Dickinson Shoehorning an island into a kitchen that’s too small is a mistake. Here are the minimum clearances the author uses between islands and cabinets, as well as minimum sizes for islands with different uses. Remember, these are minimums; it’s better to be more generous if your floor plan allows. Size and Placement Kitchen islands suck space. At minimum, an island should be 4 feet long and a little more than 2 feet deep, but it must also have room for people to move and work around it. Unless your kitchen is at least 8 feet deep and more than 12 feet long, don’t even think about an island. (For more on practical dimensions for islands and the minimum space around them, see “Island Minimums,” above.) Storage Needs You can gain valuable real estate on both the “working” side and the “public” side of an island for storage, always a critical need in kitchens. On the public side, take advantage of shallow cabinets (installed back-to-back, with deeper cabinets facing the kitchen) for serving items—napkins, cutlery, platters, etc.—that don’t need to be in the food prep area. On the working side, make sure there’s room to store the things that are needed for the activity the island supports, because an island’s strong suit is also its biggest downfall: It’s isolated. If it’s a cooking island, then pots, pans, and spices should be at hand. The space under cooktops is great for deep drawers for pots and pans. (The temptation is to hang them from an expensive pot rack, which won’t hold deeper pots or lids and gets in the way of your view.) If it’s a prep island, don’t forget storage for knives and small appliances like mixers and food processors (consider pop-ups — platforms that swing out from behind a door in the island base—or appliance garages for these), and convenient access to garbage and compost bins. If the island is going to be dedicated to cleanup, you’ll need a place for dish towels, detergent, and brushes. Undercounter storage space is limited on islands that include a sink and/or major appliances like a dishwasher or oven; you’ll have to plan more carefully for those. The same is true for cooktops with downdraft fans, the machinery for which must be stored in the cabinet below. One way around this is to use the ends of the island. Round ends are perfect for lazy Susans, and almost any island end can accommodate open shelving or even a shallow cabinet.
standard kitchen island size 3

Standard Kitchen Island Size

Size and Placement Kitchen islands suck space. At minimum, an island should be 4 feet long and a little more than 2 feet deep, but it must also have room for people to move and work around it. Unless your kitchen is at least 8 feet deep and more than 12 feet long, don’t even think about an island. (For more on practical dimensions for islands and the minimum space around them, see “Island Minimums,” above.) Storage Needs You can gain valuable real estate on both the “working” side and the “public” side of an island for storage, always a critical need in kitchens. On the public side, take advantage of shallow cabinets (installed back-to-back, with deeper cabinets facing the kitchen) for serving items—napkins, cutlery, platters, etc.—that don’t need to be in the food prep area. On the working side, make sure there’s room to store the things that are needed for the activity the island supports, because an island’s strong suit is also its biggest downfall: It’s isolated. If it’s a cooking island, then pots, pans, and spices should be at hand. The space under cooktops is great for deep drawers for pots and pans. (The temptation is to hang them from an expensive pot rack, which won’t hold deeper pots or lids and gets in the way of your view.) If it’s a prep island, don’t forget storage for knives and small appliances like mixers and food processors (consider pop-ups — platforms that swing out from behind a door in the island base—or appliance garages for these), and convenient access to garbage and compost bins. If the island is going to be dedicated to cleanup, you’ll need a place for dish towels, detergent, and brushes. Undercounter storage space is limited on islands that include a sink and/or major appliances like a dishwasher or oven; you’ll have to plan more carefully for those. The same is true for cooktops with downdraft fans, the machinery for which must be stored in the cabinet below. One way around this is to use the ends of the island. Round ends are perfect for lazy Susans, and almost any island end can accommodate open shelving or even a shallow cabinet.

Standard Kitchen Island Size

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