banner 728x90

Food Storage Made Easy

banner 728x90

Food Storage Made Easy

Your ads will be inserted here by

Food Storage Made Easy

Easy Plugin for AdSense.

Food Storage Made Easy

Please go to the plugin admin page to
Paste your ad code OR
Suppress this ad slot.

Food Storage Made Easy

0 Vote Up! Great article Adam, I have Great article Adam, I have been canning(in glass jars) my own food for a couple of years now and this year have increased my usual amount of food stores to one year worth. Canning your own food is not as scary and complicated as it first seems. Buy a high quality pressure cooker to start with.Spend the extra paper on a higher capacity one (18quarts or more)Trust me,canning is a very time consuming venture and you will be glad you can fit those extra jars in it.It will come with directions(read them!). Follow them to the letter.Also,there are many good receipe books out there on canning.Second,figure out what size jars you want(jars are reusable,cans are not).I prefer pints for meat because you can feed more people and I don’t mind leftovers(not to mention the cheaper cost when you figure the volume of food they contain).Quarts are good for fruits and veggies.Half pints are good for those with smaller nutritional needs,but thats up to you. The next thing to consider is what kinds of foods to aquire.I process fish mostly,but also wild game,beef,chicken,vegetables,and fruit.I personally don’t do soups or sauces because you are canning mostly water.Buying the food that you preserve can get expensive,but look for deals on meats,and buy your fruits and veggies from farmers in season.If you go to a farmers market or butcher shop and ask what kind of deal they will give you for a large order you may be suprised at their willingness to bargain.(ideally,harvest yourself or barter) Lastly,the best way i’ve found to can your food, is to have a canning party with a group of like minded individuals.Instead of sitting in front of the tv on a day off bring your friends and a favorite beverage into the garage to get an assembly line going.I would recommend a small operation the first time to learn what materials,tools,and organization you will need for a larger batch. A propane camp stove seems to be the most economical and portable way for me to do this.The initial cost to round up materials can be high,but once you build up your supplies,the replacement lids and fuel to cook is very low cost.I consider this an investment because I save by not buying any preserved food from the grocery store. All in all,there is something very comforting opening a jar of food and knowing exactly where it came from.
food storage made easy 1

Food Storage Made Easy

Great article Adam, I have been canning(in glass jars) my own food for a couple of years now and this year have increased my usual amount of food stores to one year worth. Canning your own food is not as scary and complicated as it first seems. Buy a high quality pressure cooker to start with.Spend the extra paper on a higher capacity one (18quarts or more)Trust me,canning is a very time consuming venture and you will be glad you can fit those extra jars in it.It will come with directions(read them!). Follow them to the letter.Also,there are many good receipe books out there on canning.Second,figure out what size jars you want(jars are reusable,cans are not).I prefer pints for meat because you can feed more people and I don’t mind leftovers(not to mention the cheaper cost when you figure the volume of food they contain).Quarts are good for fruits and veggies.Half pints are good for those with smaller nutritional needs,but thats up to you. The next thing to consider is what kinds of foods to aquire.I process fish mostly,but also wild game,beef,chicken,vegetables,and fruit.I personally don’t do soups or sauces because you are canning mostly water.Buying the food that you preserve can get expensive,but look for deals on meats,and buy your fruits and veggies from farmers in season.If you go to a farmers market or butcher shop and ask what kind of deal they will give you for a large order you may be suprised at their willingness to bargain.(ideally,harvest yourself or barter) Lastly,the best way i’ve found to can your food, is to have a canning party with a group of like minded individuals.Instead of sitting in front of the tv on a day off bring your friends and a favorite beverage into the garage to get an assembly line going.I would recommend a small operation the first time to learn what materials,tools,and organization you will need for a larger batch. A propane camp stove seems to be the most economical and portable way for me to do this.The initial cost to round up materials can be high,but once you build up your supplies,the replacement lids and fuel to cook is very low cost.I consider this an investment because I save by not buying any preserved food from the grocery store. All in all,there is something very comforting opening a jar of food and knowing exactly where it came from.
food storage made easy 2

Food Storage Made Easy

0 Vote Up! Great Write-Up Thanks Adam for the great post. I never looked into this option for food storage, because I took a slightly different approach to food storage. I try not to keep any food for the long term, instead whenever we run out of something in our kitchen pantry we replenish it from our bulk pantry. In this way, we learn how to cook with the foods that we store and we also learn what we tend to use and what we don’t use. We started with more than a years supply in the bulk pantry, but because of rising food prices we haven’t been restocking the bulk pantry in the last 6 months. I’m going to await the next market-induced deflationary episode to reload the pantry. In the meantime, I’m going to visit a local cannery and check it out. Of all the things I have learned on this site, I probably value my food storage the most. It totally changes the way you face the world. Thanks again, Jeff
food storage made easy 3

Food Storage Made Easy

Thanks Adam for the great post. I never looked into this option for food storage, because I took a slightly different approach to food storage. I try not to keep any food for the long term, instead whenever we run out of something in our kitchen pantry we replenish it from our bulk pantry. In this way, we learn how to cook with the foods that we store and we also learn what we tend to use and what we don’t use. We started with more than a years supply in the bulk pantry, but because of rising food prices we haven’t been restocking the bulk pantry in the last 6 months. I’m going to await the next market-induced deflationary episode to reload the pantry. In the meantime, I’m going to visit a local cannery and check it out. Of all the things I have learned on this site, I probably value my food storage the most. It totally changes the way you face the world. Thanks again, Jeff
food storage made easy 4

Food Storage Made Easy

0 Vote Up! Results of 1999 storage in Northeast Great article. I’ve made an appt at the local LDS facility, which accepts everyone. However, I want to point out that providentliving.org seems to suggest there is only ONE cannery in New England, and certainly not everyone is going to be able to get there due to schedules, time constraints, etc. After going to Chris’ Rowe seminar I got motivated to start an inventory of what I already have on hand, including lots of stuff from my 1999 storage spree. I have several buckets of things like wheat, rice, whole corn, etc. I stored it, in the barn, in used 5-gallon pickle buckets, with the sole addition of diatomaceous earth to the wheat. I was amazed to find that all of this stuff still looked exactly the same as it did in 1999. It may not have quite the nutritional value it did then, but it is all edible in a pinch. I’m only mentioning this to encourage those who can’t get to an LDS cannery to DO WHAT YOU CAN with available materials. Food grade buckets can be scrounged for next to nothing (hint: icing and pickles come in them), and lots of bulk foods are available through your local food coop (the monthly delivery kind, usually free to join). It is not the Rolls Royce of food storage, but it is useful and better than having nothing. For those who are financially strapped and/or have no time to join food coops, get some used buckets and fill them up with bulk grains from a feed store, after making sure that they have no additives.  Diatomaceous earth is available from most garden supply stores – it is ground up limestone and acts as an insect deterrent, while being harmless to mammals. Don’t let the distance to an LDS cannery, or the lack of companions in this effort, deter you. Start small.

banner 728x90
author
Author: 
    Outdoor Kitchen Cost
    Food Storage Made Easy Your ads will be inserted here by Food Storage
    The National Bar And Dining Rooms
    Outdoor Kitchen Cost Description Iron Chef Geoffrey Zakarian brings his vision of a
    Kitchen Door Pulls
    The National Bar And Dining Rooms Bringing your kitchen or bathroom design together
    Smitten Kitchen Gingerbread
    Kitchen Door Pulls I have a few things to tell you about this
    banner 728x90

    Leave a reply "Food Storage Made Easy"