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Bathroom Exhaust Vent

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Bathroom Exhaust Vent

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Bathroom Exhaust Vent

Vent exhaust fans through a roof hood Roof vent hood details The best exhaust fan venting is through smooth, rigid ducts with taped joints and screwed to a special vent hood. Although this isn’t always possible in attic crawl spaces, you should always insulate the duct to prevent condensation problems. You can find 4-in. duct already wrapped in insulation at home centers. If you’re tempted to vent your exhaust fan through an existing roof vent, or even vent it into the attic, don’t do it. First, you’ll partially block your roof vent with the piping, reducing the flow of cooling air through your attic. Second, during cold winters, you’ll be blowing warm, moist air onto a cold surface (the roof vent and roof plywood). The water will condense and drip into the insulation below and perhaps into the house. Special bathroom fan roof vents with an internal damper that opens only when the fan is blowing will send moist air outdoors and keep cold air out of the house. Installing a Vent Hood on the Roof Start in the attic and drill a hole through the roof in the desired vent location. Try to keep it close to the fan location. Leave the drill bit sticking through the roof so you can find the hole. From up on the roof, use a jigsaw or reciprocating saw to cut a 4-in. round hole. Next, measure out a square slightly larger than the protruding part of the vent. Remove the asphalt shingles with a hook blade fitted into a utility knife. Gently pry up the shingles around the hole, making room for the vent to slide under the first course. Apply a bead of asphalt roof cement on the bottom of the vent. Slide the vent under the shingles so they cover the top half of the vent flange. The lower half of the flange sits on top of the shingles. Nail the lower corners with roofing nails and tar the heads. Placing the vent Sealing the vent Back to Top
bathroom exhaust vent 1

Bathroom Exhaust Vent

Installing a Vent Hood on the Roof Start in the attic and drill a hole through the roof in the desired vent location. Try to keep it close to the fan location. Leave the drill bit sticking through the roof so you can find the hole. From up on the roof, use a jigsaw or reciprocating saw to cut a 4-in. round hole. Next, measure out a square slightly larger than the protruding part of the vent. Remove the asphalt shingles with a hook blade fitted into a utility knife. Gently pry up the shingles around the hole, making room for the vent to slide under the first course. Apply a bead of asphalt roof cement on the bottom of the vent. Slide the vent under the shingles so they cover the top half of the vent flange. The lower half of the flange sits on top of the shingles. Nail the lower corners with roofing nails and tar the heads. Placing the vent Sealing the vent
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Bathroom Exhaust Vent

Hi, I am planning to fix exhaust fan for my basement washroom, but I have only place available to keep my vent outside on the wall is beside Furnace exhaust (pipe). I like to know any issues if I fix my washroom exhaust fan close to Furnace exhaust? In fact it will be extended hole with 2 exhaust vent pipes side by side. One more thing is I have gas input pipe just 20″ away from Furnace exhaust pipe. Your thoughts inputs will help me in resolving this long time outstanding issues. Regards, Venu
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Bathroom Exhaust Vent

We explain how to install bathroom exhaust fans or vents, the vent ducting, the vent termination at the wall, soffit or roof, vent fan wiring, bath vent duct insulation, bath vent lengths, clearances, routing, and we answer just about any other bathroom ventilation design or installation question you may have. We discuss bath vent routing, insulation, slope, termination, airflow rate requirements and other specifications.
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Step One // How to Install a Bathroom Vent Fan Bath Vent Overview Photo by Keller & Keller Photography A bathroom without a ventilation fan is like a fireplace without a chimney: If you fail to pull the moisture generated in the bathroom out of there, it will migrate into the walls and grow mold and mildew, or blister paint and peel wallpaper. One reason many households still don’t have bath fans is that they can be intimidating to install. That’s why we asked This Old House general contractor Tom Silva to show us how. The bathroom here is below an accessible attic, so Tom ran the exhaust duct across the attic and out a gable end. Bath vent fans are rated by how many cubic feet of air they can move in one minute, known as the CFM rating. To determine which size fan to buy for your bath, multiply the room’s square footage by 1.1. For example, a 100-square-foot bath would require a 110 CFM-rated fan. Fan’ also have a sound rating, measured in sones. (A modern refrigerator operates at about one sone.) Vent fans range from as low as 0.5 sone up to about 6.0 sones. You’ll find both the CFM and sone ratings printed on the vent fan’s box.
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This article series describes how to install bathroom ventilation systems, fans, ducts, terminations. We include bathroom venting code citations and the text also explains why bathroom vent fans are needed and describes good bath vent fan choices, necessary fan capacity, and good bath vent fan and vent-duct installation details. We discuss bathroom exhaust vent codes, specifications, advice.
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Hi, I am adding a new vent + exhaust fan to my home as part of a basement remodel. The vent will service a basement laundry/utility area (dryer vent is separate) about 12 ft. away from the exterior wall. Unfortunately, the best place to exit the 4″ vent out of the house is below a kitchen window (about 4 ft. below), and adjacent to a basement window, about 2 ft. to the side. I know with the Furnace exhaust, this would not be acceptable. But, will this be ok for a simple room vent? Thanks in advance. –Geoff in Seattle, WA
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Installing a Vent Hood on the Roof Start in the attic and drill a hole through the roof in the desired vent location. Try to keep it close to the fan location. Leave the drill bit sticking through the roof so you can find the hole. From up on the roof, use a jigsaw or reciprocating saw to cut a 4-in. round hole. Next, measure out a square slightly larger than the protruding part of the vent. Remove the asphalt shingles with a hook blade fitted into a utility knife. Gently pry up the shingles around the hole, making room for the vent to slide under the first course. Apply a bead of asphalt roof cement on the bottom of the vent. Slide the vent under the shingles so they cover the top half of the vent flange. The lower half of the flange sits on top of the shingles. Nail the lower corners with roofing nails and tar the heads.
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Bob Jackson January 11, 2016 at 6:54 pm # Which “these” do you have installed on your house? The directional soffit vent with louvers? Is the soffit vent oriented so the air blows away from the house? How strong is the airflow from the vent fan? (I can feel the air blowing on my hand from 4 feet away.) Too long, undersized or loose duct connections can degrade the bathroom fan performance such that the air weakly wafts out the exhaust vent allowing it to get pulled into the attic vents instead of blowing well away from the house. I’m also wondering how the installer routed the exhaust fan duct through the AccuVent panels. Wouldn’t be surprised if the duct is constricted or knocked loose. You can send photos to bobhandymanhowto.com replace the with the @ symbol. Thanks, Bob Reply
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Which “these” do you have installed on your house? The directional soffit vent with louvers? Is the soffit vent oriented so the air blows away from the house? How strong is the airflow from the vent fan? (I can feel the air blowing on my hand from 4 feet away.) Too long, undersized or loose duct connections can degrade the bathroom fan performance such that the air weakly wafts out the exhaust vent allowing it to get pulled into the attic vents instead of blowing well away from the house. I’m also wondering how the installer routed the exhaust fan duct through the AccuVent panels. Wouldn’t be surprised if the duct is constricted or knocked loose. You can send photos to bobhandymanhowto.com replace the with the @ symbol. Thanks, Bob Reply
bathroom exhaust vent 10

If you’re tempted to vent your exhaust fan through an existing roof vent, or even vent it into the attic, don’t do it. First, you’ll partially block your roof vent with the piping, reducing the flow of cooling air through your attic. Second, during cold winters, you’ll be blowing warm, moist air onto a cold surface (the roof vent and roof plywood). The water will condense and drip into the insulation below and perhaps into the house. Special bathroom fan roof vents with an internal damper that opens only when the fan is blowing will send moist air outdoors and keep cold air out of the house.

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